CPC Driver Training
What is driver CPC?

The European Union introduced legislation from 10th September 2008 for Coach and Bus Drivers (D1 and above) and again in 2009 for professional drivers of vehicles 3.5 ton and over (C1 and above) which provided for the requirement to attain a Certificate of Competence. It is different to the Transport Manager CPC qualification and shouldn't be confused with this. The driver CPC has been introduced to maintain high standards of driving and improve road safety. This is in addition to the drivers LGV/PSV license. The qualification covers areas such as fuel efficiency, customer care, driver's hours and Tacographs and working time rules.
What does this mean to me?

Drivers who gain their Driver CPC by completing the initial qualification must complete their first cycle of periodic training within 5 years of the date they acquired their Driver CPC.

Drivers who do not maintain their Driver CPC, i.e. because they leave the industries, but who want to start working as a professional driver again, must complete 35 hours of periodic training in order to regain their Driver CPC.

They must complete the training before they can resume working professionally. Drivers holding both lorry and bus and coach licence entitlement only have to complete one lot of 35 hours periodic training.
Who is responsible for ensuring that a driver completes their Periodic Training?

It is the responsibility of the driver to ensure that they complete the Periodic Training requirement, which includes meeting any costs. Equally, it is the employer's responsibility to ensure that their company and drivers comply with current legislation, with consequence to both of none compliance. Many companies already invest in training for their staff and will also apply this to Driver CPC, however this is a decision made at the employer's discretion. The first deadline for completion of this training is 10th September 2013 for Bus and Coach and 10th September 2014 for 3.5 tonne and above (C1 and above).
How will I get my driver CPC?

Drivers will have to complete a minimum of 35 hours of approved training every 5 years.

Each training course must be of a minimum length of 7 hours, with those 7 hours being defined as contact time with the trainer.All training must be taken with an approved training centre and on an approved training course. Records of training taken by drivers will be kept centrally.

Following completion of the full 35 hour periodic training, the diver will be issued the Driver Qualification Card (DQC), which must be carried with the driver every time they drive professionally.
Does the 35 hours Periodic Training have to be completed in one block?

The driver has the flexibility to determine when the 35 hours Periodic Training will be attended.

For example, a driver may complete 7 hours per year for five years; or 35 hours in one year; or 14 hours in the first year and 21 hours in the fifth year etc.
Does the 35 hours Periodic Training have to be completed in one block?

The driver has the flexibility to determine when the 35 hours Periodic Training will be attended.

For example, a driver may complete 7 hours per year for five years; or 35 hours in one year; or 14 hours in the first year and 21 hours in the fifth year etc.
Within the definition of the Working Time Directive, does course attendance for Periodic Training count as work?

The Working Time Directive states that if a driver is paid by their employer whilst attending training, then the hours would count as working time.

Therefore if the driver is being paid whilst attending Periodic Training it would be counted as work.
Are there any Exemptions?

Drivers of the following vehicles will not be required to hold a Driver CPC:

1. A vehicle with a maximum authorised speed not exceeding 45 km/h
2. A vehicle used by, or under the control of, the armed forces, a police force, a fire and rescue authority
3. A vehicle undergoing road tests for technical development, repair or maintenance purposes, or of new or rebuilt vehicles which have not yet been put into service
4. A vehicle used in a state of emergency or assigned to a rescue mission
5. A vehicle used in the course of driving lessons for the purpose of enabling that person to obtain a driving licence or a CPC
6. A vehicle used for non-commercial carriage of passengers or goods for personal use
7. A vehicle carrying material or equipment to be used by that person in the course of his or her work, provided that driving that vehicle is not that person's principal activity.
An example of a driver under exemption vii (also known as "incidental driver") would be a brick layer who drives a load of bricks from the builder's yard to the building site and then spends their working day laying bricks. In this case, driving a lorry is incidental to their main occupation. However, drivers can move in and out of an exemption, depending on the circumstances in which they are driving. For example, a bus mechanic would be exempt while driving a bus to check that it had been repaired, but would need to hold a Driver CPC if they also drove a bus on a passenger carrying service.